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How to Get More Black, Hispanic Teachers into the Classroom

A critical first step toward building diversity among teachers involves expanding the national pool of black and Hispanic college graduates, according to research by School of Education and Social Policy alumna Constance Lindsay (PhD10).

How to Get More Black, Hispanic Teachers into the Classroom

A critical first step toward building diversity among teachers involves expanding the national pool of black and Hispanic college graduates, according to research by School of Education and Social Policy alumna Constance Lindsay (PhD10).

SESP Hosts Conference on Social Relationships

Northwestern University’s School of Education and Social Policy (SESP) is hosting an international two-day conference on the role of social relationships in homes, schools, online communities, organizations, inequality and more as part of its Global Initiative Conference series.

Rosenbaum Discusses New Book with Pacific Standard

Northwestern University sociologist James Rosenbaum, who has studied the college-for-all-movement for decades, is a leading voice in the field in part to his careful analysis of what colleges can do to improve completion rates, and his assertion that pushing all students to get a four-year bachelor’s degree is a recipe for failure, Dwyer Gunn wrote in the Pacific Standard.

A Path Out of Poverty and Poor Health

School of Education and Social Policy faculty Lindsay Chase-Lansdale and Terri Sabol are among several Northwestern University psychologists and developmental scientists working to help low-income families beat poverty and improve their health.

Schanzenbach To Lead Institute for Policy Research

Prominent economist Diane Whitmore Schanzenbach was named director of Northwestern’s Institute for Policy Research (IPR). She succeeds David Figlio, who left the position to assume his new role as dean of the School of Education and Social Policy.

Schools' Ability to Close Achievement Gap Varies Dramatically

Researchers and policymakers alike often compare the success of students between school districts, but a new Brookings report by David Figlio, and Krzysztof Karbownik indicates that school quality can vary greatly between schools in the same district.

Academic Motivation Suffers When Economic Mobility Seems Out of Reach

Mesmin Destin, Ryan Svoboda co-author new research suggesting that students’ beliefs about the possibility of social mobility have significant consequences

Children Play Key Role in Making Early Education Successful

The way children engage with their teachers, peers, and tasks is vital to the success of early-childhood education but greatly underestimated, according to new Northwestern University research.

MPES Conference Explores Partnerships

Researchers who truly want to change lives must understand the people involved in their lines of inquiry, including principals, teachers, students, and parents, Northwestern University Professor David Figlio said during the recent Multidisciplinary Program in Education Sciences (MPES) Conference in Annenberg Hall.

How to Get More Black, Hispanic Teachers into the Classroom

A critical first step toward building diversity among teachers involves expanding the national pool of black and Hispanic college graduates, according to research by School of Education and Social Policy alumna Constance Lindsay (PhD10).

How to Get More Black, Hispanic Teachers into the Classroom

A critical first step toward building diversity among teachers involves expanding the national pool of black and Hispanic college graduates, according to research by School of Education and Social Policy alumna Constance Lindsay (PhD10).

SESP Hosts Conference on Social Relationships

Northwestern University’s School of Education and Social Policy (SESP) is hosting an international two-day conference on the role of social relationships in homes, schools, online communities, organizations, inequality and more as part of its Global Initiative Conference series.

Rosenbaum Discusses New Book with Pacific Standard

Northwestern University sociologist James Rosenbaum, who has studied the college-for-all-movement for decades, is a leading voice in the field in part to his careful analysis of what colleges can do to improve completion rates, and his assertion that pushing all students to get a four-year bachelor’s degree is a recipe for failure, Dwyer Gunn wrote in the Pacific Standard.

A Path Out of Poverty and Poor Health

School of Education and Social Policy faculty Lindsay Chase-Lansdale and Terri Sabol are among several Northwestern University psychologists and developmental scientists working to help low-income families beat poverty and improve their health.

Schanzenbach To Lead Institute for Policy Research

Prominent economist Diane Whitmore Schanzenbach was named director of Northwestern’s Institute for Policy Research (IPR). She succeeds David Figlio, who left the position to assume his new role as dean of the School of Education and Social Policy.

Schools' Ability to Close Achievement Gap Varies Dramatically

Researchers and policymakers alike often compare the success of students between school districts, but a new Brookings report by David Figlio, and Krzysztof Karbownik indicates that school quality can vary greatly between schools in the same district.

Academic Motivation Suffers When Economic Mobility Seems Out of Reach

Mesmin Destin, Ryan Svoboda co-author new research suggesting that students’ beliefs about the possibility of social mobility have significant consequences

Children Play Key Role in Making Early Education Successful

The way children engage with their teachers, peers, and tasks is vital to the success of early-childhood education but greatly underestimated, according to new Northwestern University research.

MPES Conference Explores Partnerships

Researchers who truly want to change lives must understand the people involved in their lines of inquiry, including principals, teachers, students, and parents, Northwestern University Professor David Figlio said during the recent Multidisciplinary Program in Education Sciences (MPES) Conference in Annenberg Hall.

Carstensen to Speak on Lifespan Development

Stanford University’s Laura Carstensen, whose research suggests that older people are happier, better at regulating their emotions, and have a more positive outlook on the world, will deliver the Bernice Neugarten Lecture on May 22 at Northwestern University.

Sunlight, Later School Start Times Benefit Students

Students who received more sunlight before school did better academically – especially in math – than those who were exposed to less sunlight, according to new Northwestern University research.

McAdams Featured in National Podcast '1A'

Presidents should be judged on their character and competence rather than their mental health, Northwestern University psychologist Dan McAdams said on “1A,” a live, daily WAMU radio program distributed nationally by National Public Radio.

12 Economic Truths About Climate Change

Over the next 70 years, every state in the U.S. is projected to experience increasing temperatures, according to a new report on the economic facts of climate change, co-authored by Northwestern University’s Diane Schanzenbach, director of The Hamilton Project at the Brookings Institution.

Prenatal Exposure to Superfund Sites May Affect Brain Development

Children who live near hazardous waste sites can benefit from environmental cleanups, suggests one of the first large-scale studies to examine the short and long-term effects of prenatal exposure to Superfund sites on brain development.

Schoenfeld Op-Ed: Prosecutors Escape Blame in Criminal Sentencing

As a sociologist of law who has spent the last decade studying criminal justice policy and incarceration growth in Florida, Northwestern University’s Heather Schoenfeld applauds legislators who support increasing public access to criminal justice data.

Northwestern Hosts Free Screening of ‘Beyond Measure’

A free public screening of Beyond Measure, a documentary that looks at schools on the cutting edge of education reform, will be held April 19 at Northwestern University.

Schanzenbach Coauthors Op-Ed, New Report On Data

The modern economy has never been more reliant on data. But discretionary budget cuts could dramatically affect federal data collection, costing the economy more money than it saves, according to Northwestern University Professor Diane Schanzenbach, director of the Hamilton Project and a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution.

McQuillan Receives Presidential Fellowship

School of Education and Social Policy doctoral candidate Mollie McQuillan has received a 2017 Presidential Fellowship, the most prestigious award available to Northwestern University graduate students.

Figlio, Schapiro Elected to the National Academy of Education

Northwestern University School of Education and Social Policy Professor David Figlio and Northwestern University President and Professor Morton Schapiro have been elected to the prestigious National Academy of Education.

Guryan's Work Helps Spark Social Policy Revolution

Northwestern University economist Jonathan Guryan is on the front lines of a social policy revolution in Chicago, according to the latest issue of Chicago Magazine.

Guryan Addresses Gun Violence in Sun-Times Essay

Getting young people to slow down – to think before they act – can be a weapon in an anti-violence program, the School of Education and Social Policy’s Jonathan Guryan argued in the Chicago Sun-Times.

Three Faculty Members Receive Diversity Grants

School of Education and Social Policy professors Regina Lopata Logan, Marcelo Worsley and Elizabeth Gerber have received Faculty Innovation in Diversity and Equity grants from the Northwestern University Office of the Provost.

Figlio to Present School Voucher Data

Northwestern University Professor David Figlio will present his recent research on school voucher programs in Ohio and Florida on Feb. 2 during a forum at the Thomas B. Fordham Institute in Washington, D.C.

Are Great Teachers Poor Scholars?

Northwestern University President Morton Schapiro and Professor David Figlio have published research asking the question that has challenged elite universities and liberal arts colleges alike in recent times: “Are Great Teachers Poor Scholars?”

Professor Dan McAdams to Speak at SESP Graduate Event

Northwestern University Professor Dan P. McAdams, Director of the Foley Center for the Study of Lives, will present a talk titled “Authoring a Life: Narrative, Identity, Redemption, and Donald Trump,” for the inaugural SESP graduate programs gathering from 4 to 6 p.m., Thursday, Jan. 12 in room GO2 at Annenberg Hall. Food from Pita Inn will be served.

Schanzenbach Talks to NPR About Chronic Absences

A new report from the Hamilton Project at the Brookings Institution suggests that states should require school to use chronic absences to measure student success.

How the Stress of Racism Affects Learning

Northwestern research suggesting that the pressures associated with discrimination contribute to the achievement gap featured in The Atlantic.

Kirabo Jackson Finds Single-Sex Schooling Boosts School Outcomes, Lowers Crime

Recent research by SESP associate professor Kirabo Jackson's latest study finds positive evidence of single-sex education improving students' academic achievement and decreasing their criminal activity—and how that happens.

Education Week: Online Algebra Worse, Study Finds

Education Week featured a study by SESP doctoral student Jennifer Heissel showing that high-achieving students do worse in an online algebra class than through classroom instruction.

CBS News on Diane Schanzenbach's Study: Is Economy Shortening People's Lives?

CBS News features a study by SESP associate professor Diane Schanzenbach on why Americans are seeing their longevity decline and mortality rates increase. "People who are poor live a lot less -- a striking amount less -- than the rich," she said.

Education Week: Kirabo Jackson's Study Finds Lesson Plans Benefit Weaker Teachers

Giving weaker teachers good lessons plans - -not professional development -- benefits weaker teachers, according to recent research by Kirabo Jackson.

CBS News on Diane Schanzenbach's Study: Is Economy Shortening People's Lives?

CBS News features a study by SESP associate professor Diane Schanzenbach on why Americans are seeing their longevity decline and mortality rates increase. "People who are poor live a lot less -- a striking amount less -- than the rich," she said.

Sun-Times: Study Shows Innovative Counseling Program Cuts Youth Crime, Dropout

Crimes committed by young men prone to violence dropped in half, and high-school graduations rose sharply in an innovative counseling program, according to a study co-headed by SESP associate professor Jon Guryan.

NBC Features Claudia Haase's Study on Health Risks of Marital Spats

NBC affiliate WGRZ reports on SESP assistant professor Claudia Haase's finding that people -- especially men -- who scream and yell during a fight have an increased risk of chest pain or high blood pressure later in life. Those who withdraw from conflict are more likely to to have a bad back or stiff muscles.

Dan McAdams on WTTW: 'What Makes Donald Trump Tick'

SESP professor and psychologist set out to see what makes Trump tick and created a psychological portrait of the man for the June 2016 cover story of The Atlantic magazine. McAdams appeared on WTTW's Chicago Tonight.

Jeannette Colyvas to Collaborate on ‘Big Ideas’ Biomedicine Research

A “Big Ideas” grant from Northwestern’s Buffett Institute will enable SESP associate professor Jeannette Colyvas and her colleagues to create a research group in Global Medical Cultures and Law that will research “Biomedicine and Traditional Medicine across Cultures.”

Reuters: Kids Born Late Perform Better in School

Children born in the 41st week of pregnancy — which is considered “late-term” — have better test scores and are more likely to be classified as gifted in elementary and middle school, compared with children born “full-term,” that is, at 39 or 40 weeks, a new study by SESP professors David Figlio, Jonathan Guryan and their colleagues shows.

New York Times on Claudia Haase's Study: Health Impact of How You Fight

Spouses who seethed with anger while arguing were much more likely to later report symptoms of cardiac problems than calmer spouses, and those who stonewalled were more prone to have muscular problems, according to research by SESP assistant professor Claudia Haase with University of California-Berekeley.

David Brooks in New York Times Cites Kirabo Jackson's Teacher Research

Paul Tough reports on research by SESP associate professor Kirabo Jackson that shows while some teachers are good at raising their students’ test scores, other teachers are really good at improving their students’ school engagement. "Today we have to fortify the heart if we’re going to educate the mind," writes Brooks.

WTTW on Claudia Haase's Study: 'Heated Marital Spats Linked to Heart Problems'

“Past research shows that anger is linked to this state of heightened cardiovascular arousal, things like increases in blood pressure and heart rate, and chest pain” said Claudia Haase, lead author of a study analyzing the interpersonal emotional behavior of married couples and its impact on health, in a WTTW feature.

Esquire Features Claudia Haase's Study Showing Way Partners Fight Predicts Health Issues

Esquire reported SESP assistant professor Claudia Haase's research showing that displaying anger and stifling emotions during a fight predict which health issues partners will develop.

Study Finds School Leaders Widely Use Research

The largest survey yet of educational research use among school and district leaders finds positive attitudes toward the value of research and frequent use of research for decision-making. Focusing at the local level, this study is by the National Center for Research in Policy and Practice.

Late-Term Births May Offer Long-Term Future Benefits

Research by professor David Figlio shows that children born at 41 weeks performed better in school than their full-term counterparts. This research should enrich conversations with OB-GYNs about the ideal time to have a baby.

Lindsay Chase-Lansdale Elected to Harvard Board of Overseers

Lindsay Chase-Lansdale, associate provost for faculty and Frances Willard Professor of Human Development and Social Policy at Northwestern University’s School of Education and Social Policy, has been elected to the Harvard Board of Overseers.

Real Simple Reports Claudia Haase's Findings on Arguing and Health

Real Simple features research by SESP assistant professor Claudia Haase with University of California-Berkeley showing that how you argue with your partner may have serious consequences to your health.

Bloomberg Features PhD Student Claudia Persico's Research on Toxic Waste Site Impact on Kids

Children who grow up near toxic waste sites are more likely to suffer from cognitive disabilities, repeat grades, score lower on tests and misbehave in school than siblings born after the pollution has been cleaned up, research by SESP PhD student Claudia Persico and professor David Figlio suggests.

Dan McAdams on MSNBC Morning Joe: 'Mind of Donald Trump'

SESP professor Dan McAdams shares a psychologist's guide to Donald Trump's behavior on MSNBC's Morning Joe.

David Figlio: Power of Big Data for Education Problem-Solving

SESP professor David Figlio created a massive data set matching birth and education records that provides a powerful tool for research. Data science now allows social scientists to better solve problems.

Claudia Haase: Angry Outbursts Tied to Heart Problems

Exploding with anger during a marital spat can increase risk of cardiovascular problems later in life, while shutting down emotionally can contribute to back pain, according to new research by SESP's Claudia Haase and the University of California.

Atlantic Cover Story: Dan McAdams Analyzes Mind of Donald Trump

"My aim is to develop a dispassionate and analytical perspective on Trump, drawing upon some of the most important ideas and research findings in psychological science today," SESP professor Dan McAdams says at the outset of his Atlantic article.

Atlantic: Kirabo Jackson's Study Key to Understanding Teachers' Noncognitive Impact

According to resilience expert Paul Tough in The Atlantic, associate professor Kirabo Jackson's research is key to understanding that teachers who excelled at developing students' noncognitive skills had more impact on future education and wages than teachers who improved students' test performance.

Wall Street Journal Quotes Jim Rosenbaum on Value of For-Profit Colleges

In an article on the demonization of for-profit colleges, The Wall Street Journal quotes SESP professor James Rosenbaum on DeVry as an example of a for-profit that has helped students.

Ready for School, Ready for Life

SESP researchers who study how to improve early learning environments will address preschool access and quality during “Ready for School, Ready For Life,” a policy research briefing in Washington, D.C., on May 17.

Jim Spillane Comments on Common Core Controversies

Professor James Spillane is the co-author of the book Challenging Standards, which helps education leaders navigate controversy as they implement testing standards in schools.

Diane Schanzenbach in Wall Street Journal: Strengthen Food Aid

In a commentary in the Wall Street Journal, SESP associate professor Diane Schanzenbach and Robert E. Rubin call for strengthening the SNAP program to lessen food insecurity.

Jim Spillane Appointed to Advisory Board for National Science Foundation

SESP professor James Spillane was appointed to the advisory board for the National Science Foundation’s Directorate for Education and Human Resources.

Jim Rosenbaum in Inside Higher Ed: Associate Degree Good Option for Some

SESP professor James Rosenbaum doesn't think academically underprepared students from low-income backgrounds should necessarily settle for an associate degree or certificate, but neither should they be discouraged from getting a shorter-term credential than the BA, according to Inside Higher Education.

Cynthia DuBois Receives Presidential Fellowship

Human Development and Social Policy doctoral student Cynthia (CC) Dubois was awarded a prestigious Presidential Fellowship from Northwestern University.

Kirabo Jackson Named Carnegie Fellow

SESP associate professor Kirabo Jackson was named a 2016 Andrew Carnegie Fellow, based on his outstanding scholarship and proposed research on “Identifying Excellent Teachers.”

Grant Foundation Features Cynthia Coburn's Findings on 'Conceptual Use of Research'

Conceptual use of research, such as district leaders reading and discussing a book based on research about school improvement, influences policy actions and problem solving decisions across the school system, according to professor Cynthia Coburn and Caitlin Farrell.

Shanker Institute Highlights Jim Spillane's Work on Leveraging Education's 'Social Dimension'

In a new collection called "The Social Side of Education," the Shanker Institute features professor James Spillane's writing on "Broadening the Educational Capability Conversation: Leveraging the Social Dimension."

Bart Hirsch Shares Research in Washington on Teen Job Skills

As part of a White House summit called “Beating the Odds: Successful Strategies from Schools and Youth Agencies That Build Ladders of Opportunity,” SESP professor Barton Hirsch shared his findings on building job skills presented in his new book, Job Skills and Minority Youth. He will again highlight this research in a webinar on April 27.

CBS News Cites Diane Schanzenbach's Research on Food Stamps

In an article on the impact of cuts to the food stamp program being considered by Congress, CBS News cites a study by SESP associate professor Diane Schanzenbach showing the program decreased low birth weights and infant mortality.

Tutoring Program Should Be Expanded Nationally

SESP associate professor Jonathan Guryan, along with other Northwestern University and University of Chicago experts, has recommended a national scale-up of a program that has been shown to add up to two years of learning in math over a single school year for struggling high school students – without requiring any additional government funding.

Mesmin Destin in Boston Globe: Students Who See Path to College Work Harder

Boston Globe in "Pay to Play" reported SESP assistant professor Mesmin Destin's finding that poor students — but not affluent students — who learned about financial aid reported that they would study more and were more likely to consider college.

Emma Adam in Pacific Standard: 'Health Toll of Schoolyard Racism'

An article about the damaging health effects of racial discrimination cites Emma Adam's research showing discrimination during adolescence can produce long-lasting negative health effects by altering the body's natural cortisol rhythms.

Lindsay Chase-Lansdale: Today's Two-Generation Programs to Combat Child Poverty

Pacific Standard reports professor Lindsay Chase-Lansdale's research on two-generation programs. "To more effectively redirect low-income children's lives, programs should simultaneously target the child and the child's home environment," she says.

Ending Mass Incarceration in the United States

SESP assistant professor Heather Schoenfeld is investigating why states are seeking prison reform and how these efforts might help the U.S. reverse mass incarceration.

Simone Ispa-Landa in U.S. News: Academia's 'Baby Penalty'

Men fare better in academia than women -- especially women who have children, Simone Ispa-Landa and Sandra Waxman write in U.S. News.

Seattle Times: Kirabo Jackson's Study First to Show Long-Term Impact of School Spending

SESP associate professor Kirabo Jackson is the lead author of a study that is the first to show the long-term effects of school spending.

Courier Quotes Diane Schanzenbach: 'Class Size Matters'

The Louisville Courier-Journal quotes SESP associate professor Diane Schanzenbach, who has researched the long-term effects of small classes and says there is evidence that class size matters, but the question is just how much.

SESP Researchers Undertake Adolescent Stress Study in Dominica

Dominica News reports that postdoctoral researcher Royette Tavernier, who works with professor Emma Adam, is conducting a study to assess stress, coping, health and resilience among youth in Dominica after tropical storm Erika.

Forbes Features Dan McAdams on Importance of Struggle, Redemption in Life Slories

Forbes magazine describes SESP professor Dan McAdams's book The Stories We Live By in an article about the importance of struggle and redemption in life stories of business leaders. McAdams's book explores how internal narratives form our identity.

Diane Schanzenbach on White House Panel: Food Stamp Program 'Investment, Not Charity'

The federal food stamp program has a strong impact on health, education and economic self-sufficiency, according to leading economist Diane Schanzenbach, who presented at a White House panel on child hunger.

Diane Schanzenbach: 'Do Food Stamps Really Discourage Work?'

Paceific Standard quotes SESP professor Diane Schanzenbach, who is skeptical that SNAP benefits today provide much in the way of work disincentives for healthy, childless adults.

Emma Adam on WGBH: 'How Discrimination Affects Your Hormone Levels'

SESP professor Emma Adam discovered a link between cortisol levels and experiences with racism that showed the long-term effect of being discriminated against as a teenager.

Education Week Recognizes New Education Research Center Co-Led by Cynthia Coburn, Jim Spillane

Education Week notes that the Institute of Education Sciences has launched the five-year, $5 million National Center for Research in Policy and Practice, co-led by SESP professors Cynthia Coburn and Jim Spillane, "to study how research works its way into instructional decisions and education policies."

Washington Post Reports Jon Guryan's Lottery Research: 'No Lucky Stores'

There is no such thing as a "lucky" lottery store, although associate professor Jon Guryan's study found lottery sales jump as much as 38 percent at stores selling winning tickets.

Independent Quotes David Figlio on Nebraska's School Choice Bill

As Nebraska considers a bill designed to increase educational choice that provides tax credits for low- and moderate-income families, the Grand Island Independent quotes SESP professor David Figlio as saying the bill’s income eligibility rules are relatively generous.

Jim Spillane, David Figlio, Carol Lee, Kirabo Jackson Named to Edu-Scholar Top 200

School of Education and Social Policy professors James Spillane, David Figlio, Carol Lee and Kirabo Jackson were named to the Edu-Scholar Public Influence Rankings for 2016.

Contact Us

The Graduate Program in Human Development and Social Policy

School of Education and Social Policy

2120 Campus Drive
Evanston, IL 60208
Northwestern University

Phone: 847/491-4329

Email: sesp-hdsp@northwestern.edu