2012-2013 Schedule

Fall

Catalog No. Course Title Instructor Syllabus Days/Time Location
LRN_SCI 403 Foundations of the Learning Sciences
This is an introductory survey course intended primarily for first year graduate students in the Learning Sciences. Its purpose is to introduce students to basic concepts and findings of cognitive theory and research relevant to the Learning Sciences, with specific focus on how these concepts and findings apply to formal and informal learning. The course also serves to familiarize students with the culture and practices of work in the Learning Sciences so that they can begin to participate effectively in research endeavors.
Stevens, Reiser Tue 01:00PM - 04:00PM Annenberg Hall 345
LRN_SCI 425 Introduction to Design for the Learning Sciences
Design is practice. As with any practice, there are skills and knowledge that distinguish experts from others. In this class we are interested in the design of educational experiences. The phrase design of educational experiences is intended to capture the breadth of possible ways people can learn and settings in which they might learn. Examples include things like curriculum materials, educational software, workplace training, museum exhibits, and television shows. The goal of this course is to provide students with foundational skills and knowledge from which they can develop expertise in the design of educational experiences. Students will work in groups to engage in hands-on design activities.
Horn Wed 01:00PM - 04:00PM Annenberg Hall 303
LRN_SCI 434 Teacher Thinking & Learning
This course examines recent research on teacher cognition, with particular attention to the knowledge teachers bring to their work. We discuss the key components of knowledge for teaching, how that knowledge is organized and accessed, and the relationship between teachers’ knowledge and their instructional practices. We also investigate teacher learning, that is, how teachers develop the knowledge needed for teaching. We consider both the case of novice teachers learning to teach, as well as the case of veteran teachers learning to make changes in their practices.
Sherin Tue 09:30AM - 12:00PM Annenberg Hall 347
LRN_SCI 451 Topics: Thinking, Learning, and Acting with External Representations Sherin Thu 01:30PM - 04:30PM Annenberg Hall 317
LRN_SCI 451 Topics: Quantitative Methods 1
This course serves as an introduction to the quantitative methods sequence and will cover applied statistical methods. The course will provide useful tools for students who intend to conduct their own statistical analyses, as well as those who want to become critical consumers of others' analyses. Topics to be covered include descriptive measures; basic probability; sampling and sample size estimation; hypothesis testing; techniques for analyzing categorical data; ANOVA; presenting and describing statistical results. I think that quantitative methods are best learned through hands-on practice, so we will do many computer-based assignments that will involve both conducting data analysis and coherently describing the results using both numbers and words.
Schanzenbach Mon 09:00AM - 12:00PM Annenberg Hall 303
LRN_SCI 451 Topics: Journal Club
Journal Club supports you as you practice some of the skills that are crucial to reading current research articles for the purposes of building an argument that motivates or extends your own work. In addition to gleaning interesting new conceptual ideas from articles, this seminar focuses on how to identify underlying theoretical assumptions in research, critique methodologies, examine evidence in relation to claims, make sense of conclusions and implications of research. In addition, each week we take time to discuss the ways in which the article speaks to our own work - whether methodologically, theoretically, or even the direct findings to support or refute our research. All PhD students (2nd year and above), postdocs, and faculty are welcome and encouraged to attend. All that is required is for you to read the article each week and come prepared to discuss it.
Rapp Tue 10:30AM - 12:00PM Annenberg Hall 317
LRN_SCI 451 Topics: Design of Inquiry-Based Learning Environments
In this seminar, GK-12 Fellows will explore relevant Learning Science research through readings and discussion to help contextualize their classroom experiences. The seminar focuses on conceptual change, model-based inquiry, curriculum design, assessment and learning performance design, and cultural impacts on learning and engagement. A final project consists of the design, development, implementation, and evaluation of a classroom investigation linked to each Fellow's graduate research. Registration for GK-12 Fellows only.
Jona Mon 03:00PM - 06:00PM
LRN_SCI 499 Independent Study in Learning Sciences
LRN_SCI 590 Research in Learning Sciences Sherin

Winter

Catalog No. Course Title Instructor Syllabus Days/Time Location
LRN_SCI 401 Knowledge Representation for the Learning Sciences
Our concern, in the Learning Sciences, is with helping individuals to learn; we want to help them learn to engage in new tasks, and to understand things that they didn’t understand before. It is the assumption of this course that we will be in a better position to achieve these goals if we can somehow characterize the knowledge that individuals possess at any given time, and how this knowledge changes as they learn. The characterization of knowledge is the business of this course. We will explore the techniques of knowledge representation, primarily as practiced by cognitive scientists. Our goals in this regard are both theoretical and methodological. We will examine various theoretical perspectives on the nature of knowledge, and we will practice various methodological and analytical techniques for studying the knowledge possessed by individuals.
Sherin Thu 01:30PM - 04:30PM Annenberg Hall 303
LRN_SCI 426 Design of Technological Tools for Thinking and Learning
For more information on this course and example of class projects from previous years, please visit the course website.
Wilensky Wed 02:00PM - 05:00PM Annenberg Hall 303
LRN_SCI 427 Design of Learning Environments for Teachers
This course is an introduction to issues in the design, enactment, and study of innovative learning environments. The course concerns both the theory and practice of design. A crucial part of the design process is the way in which designs are taken up in the real world. This course is geared specifically towards teachers and their needs as designers. Oftentimes, teachers are given a designed curriculum and expected to make sense of and implement this design in their classroom. The way in which teachers adapt these artifacts to make them workable designs for their particular classroom situation is a primary focus of this course. In looking at how design becomes a reality in the classroom, teachers will consider implications of cognitive and social interaction learning theories for design. Throughout the course teachers will be applying these theories of design to a collaborative design project.
McGee Thu 06:15PM - 09:15PM Harris Hall L06
LRN_SCI 435 New Approaches to Science Teaching
This course will review current ideas about reforms in science education, drawing on recent research on science learning and instructional innovation, and on reform documents such as national standards. We will examine approaches that attempt to teach science throughout K-12 as a knowledge-building practice, i.e., by engaging in scientific investigations and participating in scientific practices such as argumentation, explanation, and working with scientific models. The course will provide experience in understanding student thinking, articulating learning goals, and analyzing and adapting curriculum materials in light of current research-based view of science learning. Fulfills an MSED requirement.
Reiser, Novak Thu 05:30PM - 08:30PM
LRN_SCI 451 Topics: Acquiring Inaccurate Concepts and Beliefs
People learn about the world from what they read and see. They encode and rely upon the information presented from fictional and non-fictional sources, applying the acquired knowledge to solve problems, make decisions, build opinions and arguments, and motivate future activity. This is a good thing when sources provide accurate information as a function of meticulously conducted research, rigorously developed arguments, and carefully constructed prose. However sources can contain inaccuracies, both intentional and unintentional, which people also routinely rely upon from their experiences. What makes this a perplexing problem is that people utilize incorrect information not only when they are unaware it is wrong, but also when they should a priori know or subsequently recognize the information is inaccurate. This seminar will review classic and contemporary literature that describes, explains, and attempts to remediate the phenomenon.
Rapp Tue 01:00PM - 04:00PM Annenberg Hall 317
LRN_SCI 451 Topics: Quantitative Methods 2
This course is intended to be a continuation of the quantitative methods sequence that begins with Quantitative Methods I. The course will cover applied statistical methods, and will provide useful tools for students who intend to conduct their own statistical analyses, as well as those who want to become critical consumers of others' analyses. Topics to be covered include the use of data for descriptive and causal analyses, linear regression, experimental design, panel data methods, hierarchical linear models and instrumental variables. Coursework will include both problem solving and computer-based assignments that involve conducting data analysis and writing and communicating descriptions of statistical results.
Guryan Thu 09:00AM - 11:50AM Annenberg Hall 303
LRN_SCI 451 Topics: Micro-analysis of video records of learning
Ideally students enrolled in this course will be expected to have original data to examine as part of the classwork. However, Professor Lee can provide video cases if needed. Or students may want to work jointly on a data set. The class will focus on analytic methods for examining micro-level processes of interaction using video data.

Lee Tue 10:00AM - 01:00PM Annenberg Hall 345
LRN_SCI 451 Topics: Field Methods
This course is designed to introduce students to qualitative research, including field work, document analysis, and interviewing. Students will explore qualitative research approaches by undertaking their own research study as well as reading and discussing relevant writing on the subject. The readings, topics for discussion, and assignments in this course center on three areas: (1) The epistemological underpinnings of approaches to qualitative research. (2) The practice of qualitative inquiry. Students will explore sampling strategies; research design; observation and interview techniques; and approaches to data analysis and data presentation. (3) Other key issues that researchers encounter in doing qualitative research, including ethics and social relationships in the context of field work.
Ispa-Landa Mon 02:00PM - 03:50PM Annenberg Hall 317
LRN_SCI 451 Topics: Journal Club
Journal Club supports you as you practice some of the skills that are crucial to reading current research articles for the purposes of building an argument that motivates or extends your own work. In addition to gleaning interesting new conceptual ideas from articles, this seminar focuses on how to identify underlying theoretical assumptions in research, critique methodologies, examine evidence in relation to claims, make sense of conclusions and implications of research. In addition, each week we take time to discuss the ways in which the article speaks to our own work - whether methodologically, theoretically, or even the direct findings to support or refute our research. All PhD students (2nd year and above), postdocs, and faculty are welcome and encouraged to attend. All that is required is for you to read the article each week and come prepared to discuss it.
Rapp Wed 10:30AM - 12:00PM Annenberg Hall 317
LRN_SCI 451 Organizations, Institutions and Society Colyvas Mon 10:00AM - 01:00AM Annenberg Hall 317
LRN_SCI 451 Topics: Design of Inquiry-Based Learning Environments
In this seminar, GK-12 Fellows will explore relevant Learning Science research through readings and discussion to help contextualize their classroom experiences. The seminar focuses on conceptual change, model-based inquiry, curriculum design, assessment and learning performance design, and cultural impacts on learning and engagement. A final project consists of the design, development, implementation, and evaluation of a classroom investigation linked to each Fellow's graduate research. Registration for GK-12 Fellows only.



Jona Mon 01:00AM - 04:00AM Annenberg Hall 347
LRN_SCI 499 Independent Study in Learning Sciences
LRN_SCI 519 Responsible Conduct of Research Training
LRN_SCI 590 Research in Learning Sciences Sherin

Spring

Catalog No. Course Title Instructor Syllabus Days/Time Location
LRN_SCI 402 Social Dimensions of Teaching and Learning
In this course, we combine a Learning Sciences with a Human Development perspective in order to understand the dual cognitive and socio-emotional dimensions of learning, including physiological dimensions. We examine an ecological perspective on learning and development to understand how individual mental functioning and socio-emotional well-being are related to the following:

· the nature of our interactions in social settings with other people, and
· the social organization, physical arrangements and availability of intellective resources (scaffolding, artifacts, tools, ideas).

We examine proximal (close to the individual, such as family, peer and other social networks), as well as more distal contexts (i.e. neighborhoods, nation states) that support or constrain our learning and development. Such contexts are always cultural in nature.
Lee Tue 01:30PM - 04:30PM Annenberg Hall 345
LRN_SCI 429 Design of Learning Environments
This course focuses on basic methods for designing instruction. In the first part of the course, you will conduct task analyses and student interviews to understand the knowledge, skills and dispositions learners must acquire and the learning challenges they face. Next we'll use basic interaction design methods like brainstorming, personas, scenarios and diagrams to generate and sketch possible instructional solutions. The later part of the course will focus on prototyping a lesson and lesson observation. The final task will be to design a research plan for testing a learning principle used in the design. By the end of the course you will be able to create more effective learning environments, to use research to inform design, and to develop research questions based on design.
Easterday Mon 09:00AM - 12:00PM Annenberg Hall 303
LRN_SCI 438 Teaching with Technology
Teaching with Technology is a course designed to help teachers use empirical models to explore new technologies, evaluate their educational potential, and develop scenarios of use consistent with their teaching philosophy. The course starts with a reflection on the relationship between teaching philosophy and technology use. We will also explore children’s everyday uses of technology. We then will take an in-depth look at three emerging technologies: personal broadcasting (e.g., blogs, podcasts), Wikipedia, and gaming. In each case, you will get extensive experience with the technology, examine empirical models that can be applied to the technologies, and reflect on how the technologies intersect with your teaching philosophy. The course also provides exposure to a variety of technologies that are common school settings.
McGee Tue 06:30PM - 09:30PM Annenberg Hall 303
LRN_SCI 451 Topics: Advanced Qualitative Methods
This course in advanced qualitative research is designed for students who have taken an introductory graduate course in qualitative research methods and are in the process of analyzing qualitative data for their trial research, dissertation, or some other research project. The course will focus chiefly on:

a) Analyzing qualitative data to develop and justify assertions.
b) Epistemological underpinnings of various qualitative approaches.
c) Issues of reliability, validity, and making generalizations.

The course will be conducted as a seminar with class work organized around prescribed readings on a particular issue as well as data and other materials from researchers’ and students’ qualitative studies.
Spillane Wed 09:00AM - 12:00PM Annenberg Hall 303
LRN_SCI 451 Topics: Tangible Interaction Design & Learning
Emerging interactive technologies are rapidly transforming the ways in which we work, play, communicate, and learn. Research on tangible interaction attempts to blur the line between digital technologies and the broader physical, social, and cultural worlds within which computer use is situated. This course will explore the use of tangible interaction to create innovative learning experiences and will review both theoretical and technological foundations of the field. Topics may include distributed cognition, embodied interaction, cultural forms, and tangible interaction frameworks.

Coursework will consist of weekly readings and discussions with a final paper that students will revise several times over the course of the term. This course is intended for students interested in publishing in learning sciences, human-computer interaction, or related fields.
Horn Wed 06:00PM - 09:00PM
LRN_SCI 451 Topics: Quantitative Methods III: Empirical Tools for Causal Quantitative Analysis
This course provides an introduction to many of the important tools of estimating causal models, including experimental analysis, difference-in-difference, regression discontinuity designs, propensity score matching, event study, interrupted time series, and other regression-based models. Emphasis is placed on understanding the rationales behind the empirical techniques chosen, and the interpretation of the analysis. Students develop hands-on technical skills as well as critical research-reading skills in this course.
Figlio Tue 09:00AM - 11:45AM Annenberg Hall 303
LRN_SCI 451 Topics: Computational Methods
Education research is currently undergoing a dramatic change: it is becoming increasingly computational. Graduate students in education have traditionally been trained in two methods streams: qualitative and quantitative. But continual advances in computation have begun to alter this formula by introducing new methods of research such as social network analysis, statistical natural language processing, agent-based modeling, and cognitive modeling. The purpose of this course is to provide education graduate students with an introduction to a selection of these methods. Student assignments will include programming tasks in multiple programming languages. However, no prior programming experience is required.
Sherin Mon 01:00PM - 04:00PM Annenberg Hall 317
LRN_SCI 451 Topics: Design of Inquiry-Based Learning Environments
In this seminar, GK-12 Fellows will explore relevant Learning Science research through readings and discussion to help contextualize their classroom experiences. The seminar focuses on conceptual change, model-based inquiry, curriculum design, assessment and learning performance design, and cultural impacts on learning and engagement. A final project consists of the design, development, implementation, and evaluation of a classroom investigation linked to each Fellow's graduate research. Registration for GK-12 Fellows only.
Jona Mon 03:00PM - 06:00PM Annenberg Hall 301
LRN_SCI 451 Topics: Journal Club
Journal Club supports you as you practice some of the skills that are crucial to reading current research articles for the purposes of building an argument that motivates or extends your own work. In addition to gleaning interesting new conceptual ideas from articles, this seminar focuses on how to identify underlying theoretical assumptions in research, critique methodologies, examine evidence in relation to claims, make sense of conclusions and implications of research. In addition, each week we take time to discuss the ways in which the article speaks to our own work - whether methodologically, theoretically, or even the direct findings to support or refute our research. All PhD students (2nd year and above), postdocs, and faculty are welcome and encouraged to attend. All that is required is for you to read the article each week and come prepared to discuss it.
Rapp Tue 10:30AM - 12:00PM Annenberg Hall 317
LRN_SCI 451 Topics: Readings in Philosophy of Education
This course is open to all doctoral students in LS and HDSP. Its goal is to give students historical and philosophical perspective on the foundations of current educational and psychological theories. Readings will include Books I-VII of Plato's Republic, Rousseau's Emile (Books 1-3, portion of Book IV), Dewey's Democracy and Education (Books 1-8, ) Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics (Books 1-4,6, 10). The course will be run as a series of interpretive discussions that feature close reading of these classic texts. In addition to reading, discussing, and preparing questions about meaning of the texts, students will write a final paper in which they relate the philosophies to their own research and/or issues of concern to them. Discussion of current, relevant theory will take place throughout the course.
Haroutunian-Gordon Wed 01:30PM - 04:30PM 618 Garrett Place Conference Room
LRN_SCI 468 Leading with Technology McGee Tue 06:30AM - 09:30AM Annenberg Hall 303
LRN_SCI 499 Independent Study in Learning Sciences
LRN_SCI 590 Research In Learning Sciences Sherin

Summer

Catalog No. Course Title Instructor Syllabus Days/Time Location
LRN_SCI 499 Independent Study in Learning Sciences
LRN_SCI 590 Research in Learning Sciences Sherin