School News





Northwestern's Public Interest Program (NUPIP) is the only student-run fellowship program of its kind in the nation
NUPIP co-founder Jon Marino (far left, BS06), who was a fellow at the Chicago Public Schools Service Learning Initiative planning service learning projects, is shown on a trip with students in Colorado.

Northwestern's Public Interest Program (NUPIP) is the only student-run fellowship program of its kind in the nation, and it's coordinated by four SESP students. The program places Northwestern graduates in public interest jobs throughout the Chicago area for one year, with the goal of introducing these fellows to nonprofit organizations with missions promoting systemic social change.

Seniors Kelly Kirkpatrick and Sam Schiller, together with junior Maddie Orenstein and sophomore Stephanie Arias, coordinate the three-year-old program. The students recruit organizations and applicants, publicize the program and communicate with fellows. "There's so much that's exciting about growing it on our own and keeping it grassroots," notes Orenstein.

Numerous SESP students have been fellows, described by Orenstein as "change agents." For 2008-09, SESP alumnae Molly Day (BS07), Melanie Kahl (BS08) and Rachel Patten (BS06) are NUPIP fellows. Day is working with campusCatalyst, the nonprofit she founded to train students in community development; Kahl is with the Office of New Schools at Chicago Public Schools; and Patten is at Adler Planetarium.

The program was founded in 2005 by SESP alumni Jon Marino and Lauren Parnell (both BS06), along with School of Communication professor Paul Arntson and SESP faculty member John Kretzmann. Weekly seminars and alumni mentoring are important components of NUPIP, which was modeled after a program at Princeton University. "So many SESP graduates have learned that they want to make a positive difference in Evanston and Chicago and beyond — NUPIP offers about 15 each year the opportunity to participate in meaningful work for the public good," says Kretzmann.
BACK TO TOP



SESP Students National Lacrosse Champs


Eight SESP students were teammates on the lacrosse team that won the NCAA championship for the fourth year in a row
Senior Hannah Nielsen
Photo courtesy of Northwestern Athletics

Eight SESP students were teammates on the lacrosse team that won the NCAA championship for the fourth year in a row. They are seniors Hilary Bowen, Mary Kate Casey and Hannah Nielsen; juniors Danielle Spencer and Caroline Tesar; sophomores Colleen Magarity and Brittany Wilbon; and Lindsay North (BS08).

Nielsen and Bowen amassed numerous national honors. Nielsen was named wonemslax.com Player of the Year, American Lacrosse Conference Player of the Year and All American. She also won the Tewaaraton Trophy and Honda Sports Award. Bowen is a 2008 All American and a first-team ESPN The Magazine Academic All-District selection.


BACK TO TOP





With a new iLab project underway at SESP and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, even high schools that barely have funding for test tubes can access the most advanced science laboratory equipment in the world — including instruments using output from nuclear reactors
Through iLab, high school students can remotely control instruments such as this neutron beam spectrometer.
Photo courtesy of Phillip Long

With a new iLab project underway at SESP and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, even high schools that barely have funding for test tubes can access the most advanced science laboratory equipment in the world — including instruments using output from nuclear reactors.

The goal of the iLab Network, which recently received a two-year $1 million grant from the National Science Foundation, is to help students learn more and become more engaged with science through remote access to world-class scientific instrumentation. The Office of Science, Technology, Engineering and Math Education Partnerships (OSEP) is developing a series of remote laboratory experiments for high schoolers, in partnership with MIT.

For example, advanced high school students will be able to use mass spectrometers at Northwestern, a neutron beam diffraction lab at MIT and devices from other universities worldwide. Instead of being limited by available supplies, teachers using iLabs will be able to "reconfigure science labs in a way that makes much more sense pedagogically. Labs can now be done in study hall or as homework," notes research associate professor Kemi Jona, principal investigator on the project.

For students, the main benefit is "exposure to new sets of real experimental data that high schools normally would not be able to collect," says Evanston physics teacher Mark Vondracek. "There's real excitement in using the equipment scientists actually use and working with it the way scientists do," adds Dean Grosshandler, associate director of OSEP. This fall schools including Chicago Public Schools, Illinois Math and Science Academy, Illinois Virtual High School and Evanston Township will begin using the remote labs.

BACK TO TOP



Meaningful Science Prepares Urban Teens for College

In high school classrooms throughout Chicago, students are trying to figure out what would happen if they played their favorite sport on the moon. For this project they must master physics concepts including gravity and force
The Meaningful Science Consortium introduces Chicago public high school students to Northwestern's science laboratories.
Photo by Andrew Campbell

In high school classrooms throughout Chicago, students are trying to figure out what would happen if they played their favorite sport on the moon. For this project they must master physics concepts including gravity and force.

The Meaningful Science Consortium, led by SESP, brings such innovative project-based science to the Chicago Public Schools as part of a reform effort to prepare students for college-level work. The four-year curriculum is based on the premise that students learn best when they see a real-life purpose and engage in hands-on inquiry.
BACK TO TOP




Barbara Smith Wynne (BS55) of Indianapolis, a magazine publisher, community leader and child advocate, is the recipient of the 2008 Northwestern University Alumni Association Alumni Merit Award for the School of Education and Social Policy. A ceremony on September 26 honors all the alumni award winners.

Wynne, who founded Indy's Child parenting magazine in 1984, continues to be publisher and columnist. A former Northwestern tennis player, she sees tennis as a means to encourage children's development. Wynne initiated the local USA Tennis National Junior Tennis League program in Indianapolis, which provides low-cost tennis lessons to nearly 2,000 children, and is president of the Indianapolis Junior Tennis Development Program.
BACK TO TOP




Matthew Sunshine, a freshman in the School of Education and Social Policy from Cold Spring Harbor, New York, died on June 10. "Matt was a bright and engaged student and will be greatly missed," says Susan Olson, assistant dean of student affairs. A memorial vigil was held on campus in June.
BACK TO TOP





wear a SESP T-shirt School of Education and Social Policy apparel is available through Norris Center Bookstore.


BACK TO TOP