December 2012 News Stories

December 2012 News Stories

  • Promote 360 Plans Host of Mentoring Activities for 2013
    Promote 360, the SESP student organization that fosters minority students’ well being, is planning a new focus on college mentoring activities this year.
    1/23/13

  • Four Museums Nationwide Install Mike Horn’s ‘Life on Earth’ Exhibit
    Soon the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago will feature an innovative exhibit developed by SESP assistant professor Michael Horn and his colleagues at other universities. By the end of the year, the “Life on Earth” installation, which invites discovery about evolution and the history of life on Earth, will be open at four science museums nationwide.
    1/23/13

  • Fuse Drop-In Program Ignites Teens’ Interest in Science and Arts
    The Fuse drop-in program draws young people into science, technology, engineering, arts and math (STEAM) with “cool” hands-on activities. The Office of STEM Education Partnerships continues to expand Fuse and will soon offer the informal learning program at two Chicago Public Library sites.
    1/23/13

  • Kirabo Jackson Finds Non-Cognitive Skills Add to Teachers’ Impact
    Many experts question the value of tests alone to assess a teacher’s impact. A new study by assistant professor Kirabo Jackson adds weight to that view by showing that teachers influence important non-cognitive skills linked to adult success.
    1/23/13

  • Students in SESP Philanthropy Class to Give Away $100,000
    Students taking a new School of Education and Social Policy course about philanthropy this spring will put their learning into action in a distinctive new way. The students not only will examine the history and practice of philanthropic giving but will actually give away $100,000 to nonprofit organizations that can impact children and adults.
    1/23/13

  • 'Computational Thinking' Critical for New K-12 Standards
    The Office of STEM Education Partnerships hosted a workshop for educators on computational thinking on November 28, organized by Michelle Paulsen, Reach for the Stars coordinator. Educators learned how to use computational problem solving to strengthen K-12 science and math learning.
    12/4/12

  • Dilara Sayeed (MS00) Takes Professional Development to the Global Level
    Dilara Sayeed (MS00) is taking her commitment to educator development worldwide with the establishment of a global teacher network. “For the rest of my career I’ll be working on the development of educators and school leaders,” she says.
    1/24/13

  • Education Week: Brian Reiser Says Science Standards Require a Teacher-Learning Rethink
    Professor Brian Reiser, writing an opinion piece in Education Week with Jean Moon and Sarah Michaels, emphasizes the need to revamp professional development and preservice education for teachers to complement the Next Generation Science Standards.
    12/4/12

  • Maddie Orenstein (BS10) Wins Fulbright Fellowship to Research Education in Chile
    Maddie Orenstein (BS10), a SESP social policy graduate, has won a Fulbright fellowship 2013 to study education in Chile. Her focus will be on high school students’ activism for college access.
    12/4/12

  • SESP Faculty Discuss College Access at Quest Scholars Network Event
    At a Quest Scholars Network event, SESP faculty members Mesmin Destin, James Rosenbaum, dean Penelope Peterson and Northwestern President Morton Schapiro explored solutions to the inequity in college access. SESP student Daniel Nissani, co-president of the Quest Scholars Network, organized the event and acted as moderator for the panel discussion.
    12/6/12

  • Young Entrepreneur Quotes Elizabeth Gerber on the Benefits of Crowdfunding
    In a Young Entrepreneur article assistant professor Elizabeth Gerber describes benefits to crowdfunding platforms, which enable entrepreneurs to raise money from consumers. They also provide communications experience and improvements to business plans.
    12/12/12

  • Julie Kornfeld (BS11) Publishes Senior Honors Thesis
    A thesis written by Julie Kornfeld (BS11) as a SESP senior honors student was recently published in a widely read University of Oxford publication focusing on refugee issues. Kornfeld’s article in Forced Migration Review reports her research findings on the role of cultural orientation programs in overseas refugee camps and how they shape perceptions of resettlement in U.S. society.
    12/6/12

  • Kemi Jona and Evanston Teacher Mark Vondracek Describe Online Radioactivity Experiment
    In a new article in The Physics Teacher, SESP research professor Kemi Jona and Evanston Township High School physics teacher Mark Vondracek explain a remote radioactivity experiment that all high school students can access. They position the experiment as an example of a way for schools with limited science resources to improve their science students' learning.
    12/12/12

  • DNAInfo.com: Jeanne Marie Olson Analyzes Data from Chicago Public Schools
    Learning and organizational change faculty member, researcher and designer Jeanne Marie Olson is applying her skills in systems analysis to the bureaucracy of Chicago Public Schools. She has teamed up with the citizen advocacy group Raise Your Hand to analyze CPS data on underused schools.
    12/12/12

  • Teachers College Record Praises Jim Spillane's Latest Book on Diagnosis and Design
    Teachers College Record lauds Diagnosis and Design for School Improvement by professor James Spillane and Amy Coldren (PhD07) as "pragmatic and insightful." Reviewer Thomas Hoerr says, "Their analysis is an empowering one. By highlighting the barriers with which we dance each day, they enable us to think about how to diagnose and design so that the constraints can be overcome."
    12/12/12

  • Washington Post Cites Kirabo Jackson's Study on Cash Incentives
    The Washington Post comments on a cash incentive program for students that is modeled after the Texas program assistant professor Kirabo Jackson studied. He found “the campuswide increases in the percentage of students in 11th and 12th grades who take AP or IB [International Baccalaureate] exams are driven primarily by increased participation among black and Hispanic students." He also found increases in ACT and SAT scores.
    12/13/12

  • Michael Wolf's New Study Shows Medication Guides Too Complex to Be Understandable
    A new study by assistant professor Michael Wolf finds that the information sheets stapled to prescriptions are too complex and difficult for people to understand, Reuters Health reports. His team is working on a how-to guide to make educational information more understandable.
    12/18/12

  • Elizabeth Gerber in Huffington Post: Crowdfunding Fails Some Promising Entrepreneurs
    In a Huffington Post blog post, assistant professor Elizabeth Gerber writes about "crowdfunding," where budding capitalists reach out to thousands of people to ask for small amounts of money. But because some budding entrepreneurs lack a social network that includes people who can afford to give away money, crowdfunding is helping well-connected middle-class entrepreneurs -- and leaving many others' brilliant ideas behind.
    12/18/12

  • Herald-Tribune: Fay Cook Says Politics of Social Security at Odds with Public Support
    The Herald-Tribune quotes professor Fay Cook about discussions in Washington on Social Security being at odds with the desires of the American public. Opinion polls reveal consistent bipartisan support for preserving Social Security in its existing form, and she urges caution in making changes.
    12/21/12

  • Kemi Jona Comments on Advantages of Massive Open Online Courses
    Professor Kemi Jona tells InformationWeek of several advantages to the massive open online courses (MOOCs) that are increasingly popular. He says research suggests online environments may be more conducive to risk-taking and student participation. He thinks the current excitement about MOOCs is because of economics.
    12/20/12

  • Fuse Drop-In Program for STEM Activities Adds Evanston Library as New Site
    The Office of STEM Education Partnerships will now offer the Fuse drop-in program at the Evanston Public Library. Fuse engages youth in science, technology, engineering, arts and math through hands-on exploratory challenges.
    12/20/12

  • Freakonomics Features Diane Schanzenbach's Study Showing Benefits of Safety Net for Children
    A new study by associate professor Diane Schanzenbach finds significant health benefits resulting from food stamps in childhood. These impacts last for decades, according to this research, which is the first to document effects including a reduction of metabolic syndrome and increase in women's economic self-sufficiency.
    12/21/12

  • CNN Blog: Miriam Sherin Says Grades Don't Tell Us as Much as We Think
    In a CNN blog, professor Miriam Sherin writes that report cards -- good or bad -- might not tell parents how much their children are learning. She looks at alternate ways to assess learning, as well as the pros and cons of grades.
    12/27/12

  • Two SESP Students Win Undergraduate Research Grants
    SESP seniors Victoria Romba and Birong Wang were awarded $1,000 Undergraduate Research Grants during fall quarter from the Northwestern University Office of the Provost. Their research topics investigate early adulthood and the impact of language.
    12/27/12