March 2014 News Stories

March 2014 News Stories

  • Cynthia Coburn Addresses Digital Media and Learning Conference
    Professor Cynthia Coburn, who is interested in spreading innovative practices and programs for youth, will address hundreds of specialists in learning and digital media at the Digital Media and Learning conference in Boston on March 7.
    3/5/14

  • Diane Schanzenbach Tells VOXXI Why Small Class Size Matters for Student Outcomes
    “What people are forgetting is the tried and true, high-quality teachers in small classes really does work,” associate professor Diane Schanzenbach told VOXXI. Her analysis of studies, done for the National Education Policy Center at the University of Colorado, shows the importance of small class size for student learning and long-term outcomes.
    3/5/14

  • Faculty, Students Give Presentations at AERA Conference
    At the annual meeting of the American Education Research Association (AERA) in Philadelphia from April 3 to 7, 43 Northwestern University faculty members and graduate students will give presentations related to education r
    2/19/14

  • Sophie Haroutunian-Gordon’s New Book Highlights Interpretive Discussion
    Professor Sophie Haroutunian-Gordon offers a valuable approach for teachers in her new book Interpretive Discussion: Engaging Students in Text-Based Conversation. The book is available March 18, published by the Harvard Education Press.
    3/6/14

  • Jon Guryan's CNN Op-Ed: Intensive Tutoring Keeps Teens from Falling through Cracks
    What urban school systems need is a "safety net" to catch students who start falling behind through individualized and intensive instruction, say associate professor Jon Guryan and Jens Ludwig in a CNN opinion piece. They studied one such plan that is financially low-cost but had significant results in closing the achievement gap.
    3/12/14

  • Jim Spillane Addresses Three-College Leadership Conferences in Ireland
    Professor James Spillane shared his expertise in organizational leadership when he addressed scholars in Ireland recently. At a leadership symposium organized by three colleges, he spoke to higher education professionals, faculty members, graduate students and researchers.
    3/12/14

  • Fay Cook to Lead National Science Foundation Directorate
    The National Science Foundation (NSF) has selected SESP professor Fay Lomax Cook, Institute for Policy Research social policy expert and former director, as an NSF assistant director to head its Directorate for Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences (SBE).
    3/12/14

  • Boston Globe: Paula Olszewski-Kubilius Comments on Need for Gifted Education Policies
    The Boston Globe interviews Paula Olszewski-Kubilius about the need for states and school districts to set policies for identifying gifted students and providing them with academic enrichment. Olszewski-Kubilius is former president of the National Association for Gifted Children.
    3/18/14

  • Chicago Tribune Quotes Jon Guryan on Pros and Cons of Minimum Wage Hike
    Associate professor Jon Guryan, an economist, says raising the minimum wage is "potentially a policy to stem the increases in income inequality that we've seen in the U.S. in the past 30 to 40 years." The con is that "it's not helping as many or as large a portion of the labor market as you probably would like. And it has some unintended consequences, potentially."
    3/18/14

  • Diane Schanzenbach Tells CNBC Millions of Kids Are Food Stamp Recipients
    Associate professor Diane Schanzenbach talks with CNBC about food stamp recipients. The vast majority of food stamps go to children, disabled people and the elderly -- "we don't expect them to work themselves." Her research has shown that children in need benefit when their parents get food stamps, and benefits extend into adulthood.
    3/18/14

  • Chicago Tribune Features Lindsay Chase-Lansdale's Two-Generation Project in Evanston
    The Chicago Tribune describes the new Evanston Two-Generation Education Initiative, with research led by SESP professor Lindsay Chase-Lansdale. This pilot program for the Evanston Community Foundation is designed to promote economic self-sufficiency for Evanston families--and to enhance the academic and life success of their children.
    3/20/14

  • Inside Higher Ed Features Mesmin Destin's Essay on Helping First-Generation College Students Succeed
    Assistant professor Mesmin Destin's opinion piece in Inside Higher Education highlights the need to raise awareness about providing a welcoming environment for first-generation college students. His research shows that talking about social class equips first-generation and low-income students to succeed.
    3/18/14

  • Juvenile Justice Exchange Highlights Emma Adam's Comments on Teen Brain
    The Juvenile Justice Information Exchange features comments by professor Emma Adam about the adolescent brain and teens' tendency to seek risky behavior. "Brains during adolescence become more sensitive to rewards,” said Adam, but at the same time brain centers for judgment and control are not fully developed.
    3/18/14

  • Center for Talent Development Presents Educator’s Conference April 11
    High-ability students and the Common Core take center stage at an educator’s conference presented by SESP’s Center for Talent Development (CTD) on April 11. All educators and SESP students are invited to attend “Meeting Common Core Standards through Problem-Based Learning.”
    3/20/14

  • Policy Briefing Highlights Two-Generation Initiatives
    SESP faculty members Lindsay Chase-Lansdale and Mesmin Destin will share their insights on two-generation education initiatives at an April 16 policy briefing called “Two Generations, One Future.” The Institute for Policy Research is hosting the event from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Evanston Township High School.
    3/20/14

  • Education Next Looks at Jim Spillane's 1990s Study of Standards for Lessons on Common Core
    In an article about the impact of common core standards, Education Next cites professor James Spillane's in-depth study of nine Michigan districts in the early 1990s, which found wide variations in how teachers interpreted and applied state standards. His research resulted in the book Standards Deviation.
    3/26/14

  • Three SESP Students Receive Undergraduate Research Grants
    School of Education and Social Policy seniors Billy Choo, Brenna Ledvora and Kathryn Thomas were awarded Undergraduate Research Grants or Conference Travel Grants from the Office of the Provost for winter quarter.
    3/27/14

  • Jim Spillane Presents Talks in Belgium on Education Leadership
    An international authority on education leadership, SESP professor James Spillane gave presentations in Belgium recently on education leadership and policy. His audiences spanned practitioners, policy makers and scholars.
    3/27/14

  • Larry Hedges Receives AERA Presidential Citation for Research Excellence
    Professor Larry Hedges has been selected to receive the 2014 Presidential Citation for research excellence from the American Education Research Association (AERA), the nation’s preeminent education research organization.
    3/27/14

  • Center for American Progress Cites Jon Guryan's and Diane Schanzenbach's Research on Medicare and Food Stamps
    A Center for American Progress policy analysis refers to SESP associate professor and economist Jonathan Guryan's research showing Medicare led to a dramatic decline in the black-white infant health and mortality gap and associate professor Diane Schanzenbach's research finding that food stamps led to economic self-sufficiency for women.
    4/1/14

  • Washington Post Cites Kirabo jackson's Research Showing Impact of Cash Incentives for AP Scores
    The Washington Post cites associate professor Kirabo Jackson's research finding that in Texas, cash bonuses and extra support sparked an increase in AP and IB test takers primarily among black and Hispanic students. The portion of students scoring above 1100 on the SAT or above 24 on the ACT increased 80 percent for black students and 50 percent for Hispanic students.
    4/1/14

  • Carol Lee Receives DuSable Museum Award
    The DuSable Museum of African American History is honoring professor Carol Lee with its top 2014 award, the Dogon Award, which will be presented at the Night of 100 Stars Awards event on April 5.
    4/1/14