Four SESP Graduates Named NUPIP Fellows

Four SESP Graduates Named NUPIP Fellows

Four 2016 graduates of the School of Education and Social Policy were selected as fellows for the Northwestern University Public Interest Program (NUPIP). Cara Conway, Arianna Farmer, Raven Johnson and Paige Kaliski will work with Chicago nonprofit organizations, pursuing interests in public service that they developed during college.

NUPIP is a one-year fellowship that helps train a new generation of leaders for social change through paid public interest work, professional development seminars and mentorship by Northwestern alumni. NUPIP, a program of the Center for Civic Engagement (CCE) at Northwestern, introduces fellows to organizations that work for the public interest and allows these organizations to add the abilities of Northwestern graduates. 


Cara Conway

Cara Conway

Cara Conway will be working for Urban Partnership Bank, a community development bank that provides financial services to economically distressed neighborhoods in Chicago and promotes economic growth in these areas. She will participate in a program to work in several different departments within the bank.

“The Center for Civic Engagement has been important to me throughout my time at Northwestern, starting with my participation in Engage Chicago after my freshman year. I wanted to be an NUPIP fellow because the CCE has great resources to further my passion for community development and civic engagement, and NUPIP is a great program for a recent graduate with my interests. I look forward to combining my new job with the mentorship, community and professional development that NUPIP has to offer,” says Conway.


Arianna Farmer

Arianna Farmer

Arianna Farmer, who majored in social policy, will work as a research project assistant at Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, a research and policy institute. Chapin Hall focuses on a mission of improving the well-being of children and youth, families, and their communities.

“I wanted to participate in NUPIP because I knew I wanted to go into a public interest job but loved the idea of being connected with a whole group of other fellows and a mentorship program throughout my first year out of college,” says Farmer, referring to the network of fellows who have professional development seminars and mentorship opportunities together.


Raven Johnson

Raven Johnson

Raven Johnson wanted to be a NUPIP Fellow because of the community the program fosters. “From conversations with PIP alumni and interactions with the staff, I’ve gathered that the passions of PIP affiliates drive their desire to be social change agents by pairing fellows with real-life experiences, ABCD strategies and mentorships,” says Johnson, referring to the strategies of the Asset-Based Community Development Institute.

She will be working with Heartland Alliance, a global nonprofit that advances human rights by providing services in health, housing, job training and justice. “It’s an opportunity I am enthralled to have as I can lend my hand in bringing about much-needed systemic change,” explains Johnson, who majored in learning and organizational change.


Paige Kaliski

Paige Kaliski

Paige Kaliski will be working at the Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning, a government agency that integrates planning for land use and transportation in northeastern Illinois.

“I wanted to participate in the NUPIP program because I've always known I wanted to work in the public sector, but was a little lost on where to begin. NUPIP connected me to organizations they were familiar with and thought I would be a good fit for, which helped me to get my foot in the door,” says Kaliski.


NUPIP history

Through NUPIP, which is modeled after Princeton University's Project 55 program, fellows participate in weekly seminars and alumni mentoring. At the seminars NUPIP fellows join Princeton and University of Chicago graduates to hear experts address relevant topics and to discuss common challenges and satisfactions of working for the social good.

Northwestern students may apply to the program during their senior year, with applications due in January. The program also seeks alumni mentors who can work with fellows in their various fields of interest. Alumni who know of networking opportunities or would like to become involved with this program may contact NUPIP at nupip@northwestern.edu.

NUPIP was founded in 2005 by SESP alumni Jon Marino (BS06) and Lauren Parnell (BS07), along with School of Communication professor Paul Arntson and SESP faculty member John Kretzmann.

By Marilyn Sherman
Last Modified: 6/22/16