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Profile

Karen McCurdy

Karen McCurdy

Professor and Chair, Human Development & Family Studies , University of Rhode Island


Biography

Karen McCurdy is Professor and Chair, Human Development & Family Studies, at the University of Rhode Island. Dr. McCurdy received a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science from Stanford University and a PhD in Human Development and Social Policy from Northwestern University. Her scholarship has focused on promoting optimal child and family development among vulnerable families, with an emphasis on examining the potential environmental, familial and individual conditions that influence decisions to engage in child abuse prevention programs. She recently led an NIH-funded study assessing factors that may contribute to child overweight and food security among low-income families, and is lead PI for an ongoing project to recruit qualified professionals to early intervention programs in Rhode Island.

Research/Scholarship

Education

Year Degree Institution
1997 PhD, Human Development and Social Policy Northwestern University
BA, Political Science Stanford University

Dissertation

Year Title  
1997 A Little Help from My Friends: A Transactional Analysis of Parenting in Disadvantaged Families

Selected Publications

McCurdy, K., Gorman, K., Kisler, T., & Metallinos-Katsaras, E (2014). Associations between family food behaviors, maternal depression, and child weight among low-income children. Appetite, 79: 97-105.

McCurdy, K., Gorman, K., Kisler, T., and Metallinos-Katsaras, E (2012). Maternal mental health and child health and nutrition in V. Maholmes and R. King (Eds.), The Oxford Handbook on Child Development & Pov (pp. 124-144). Oxford, OH: Oxford University Press..

McCurdy, K., and Metallinos-Katsaras, E. (2011). Socio-demographic determinants of food security status among first-time WIC participants. Topics in Clinical Nutrition, 26 (3): 216-228.

McCurdy, K., Gorman, K., and Metallinos-Katsaras, E (2010). From poverty to food insecurity and child overweight: A family stress approach. Child Development Perspectives, 4 (2): 144-151.

Last Updated: 2014-09-08 15:33:02