Profile

Profile

Leah Doane

Leah Doane

Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology , Arizona State University


Biography

Doane investigates the physiological mechanisms underlying developmental psychopathology and everyday stressful experiences in childhood, adolescence and young adulthood. She has training in human development and developmental psychophysiology. She has expertise in collecting, measuring and modeling physiological markers of stress and strain in naturalistic settings including measures of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis and objective sleep

Research/Scholarship

Education

Year Degree Institution
2008 PhD, Human Development and Social Policy
Human Development and Social Policy
Northwestern University

Selected Publications

Doane, L.D. & Van Lenten, S (Working Paper/In Press/Under Review). Multiple time courses of salivary alpha-amylase and dimensions of affect in adolescence. Psychoneuroendocrinology.

Doane, L.D., Gress-Smith, J., & Breitenstein (Working Paper/In Press/Under Review). Multi-method assessments of sleep over the transition to college and the associations with depressive and anxiety symptoms. Journal of Youth and Adolescence.

Doane, L.D. & Zeiders, K.H. (2014). Negative affect and cortisol in adolescence: The moderating roles of discrimination and social support. Journal of Adolescent Health, 54: 536-542.

Taylor, Z.E., Doane, L.D. & Eisenberg, N (2014). Transitioning from high school to college: Relations of social support, resiliency, and adjustment during Emerging Adulthood. Emerging Adulthood, 2(2): 105-115.

Doane, L.D. & Thurston, E (2014). Associations among sleep, daily experiences, and loneliness in adolescence: Evidence of moderating and bidirectional pathways. Journal of Adolescence, 37: 145-154.

Doane, L.D., Mineka, S., Zinbarg, R., Craske, M., Griffith, J. & Adam, E. K (2013). Are flatter diurnal cortisol rhythms associated with major depression and anxiety disorders in late adolescence? The role of life stress and daily negative emotion. Development and Psychopathology, 25(3): 629-642.

Last Updated: 2014-09-08 15:02:55