Research News Archive

Research News Archive

Sandra Waxman in <em>Scientific American</em>: Cultural Differences in Autism Diagnoses

Sandra Waxman in Scientific American: Cultural Differences in Autism Diagnoses

Behaviors that are considered red flags in the U.S. and Western Europe are considered normal, even desirable, in other parts of the world, according to professor Sandra Waxman and her blog co-authors.

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Mesmin Destin Selected as William T. Grant Scholar

Mesmin Destin Selected as William T. Grant Scholar

SESP assistant professor Mesmin Destin was selected for the 2016 class of William T. Grant Scholars.

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Kirabo Jackson Named Carnegie Fellow

Kirabo Jackson Named Carnegie Fellow

SESP associate professor Kirabo Jackson was named a 2016 Andrew Carnegie Fellow, based on his outstanding scholarship and proposed research on “Identifying Excellent Teachers.”

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Grant Foundation Features Cynthia Coburn's Findings on 'Conceptual Use of Research'

Grant Foundation Features Cynthia Coburn's Findings on 'Conceptual Use of Research'

Conceptual use of research, such as district leaders reading and discussing a book based on research about school improvement, influences policy actions and problem solving decisions across the school system, according to professor Cynthia Coburn and Caitlin Farrell.

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Shanker Institute Highlights Jim Spillane's Work on Leveraging Education's 'Social Dimension'

Shanker Institute Highlights Jim Spillane's Work on Leveraging Education's 'Social Dimension'

In a new collection called "The Social Side of Education," the Shanker Institute features professor James Spillane's writing on "Broadening the Educational Capability Conversation: Leveraging the Social Dimension."

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Mesmin Destin in <em>Boston Globe</em>: Students Who See Path to College Work Harder

Mesmin Destin in Boston Globe: Students Who See Path to College Work Harder

Boston Globe in "Pay to Play" reported SESP assistant professor Mesmin Destin's finding that poor students — but not affluent students — who learned about financial aid reported that they would study more and were more likely to consider college.

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Ending Mass Incarceration in the United States

Ending Mass Incarceration in the United States

SESP assistant professor Heather Schoenfeld is investigating why states are seeking prison reform and how these efforts might help the U.S. reverse mass incarceration.

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SESP Studies Show New Funding Improves Schools, <em>Slate</em> Reports

SESP Studies Show New Funding Improves Schools, Slate Reports

Research by associate professors Diane Schanzenbach and Kirabo Jackson show new funding for schools improves student achievement and school quality.

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College Success: Jim Rosenbaum Sees Alternatives to Bachelor's Programs

College Success: Jim Rosenbaum Sees Alternatives to Bachelor's Programs

With nearly half of community college students dropping out, professor James Rosenbaum finds good options to a bachelor's degree for lower-income students.

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How Early Is Infants' Attention Affected by Culture?

How Early Is Infants' Attention Affected by Culture?

By age two, infants’ attention to objects and events may be shaped by their culture, according to new cross-cultural research by professor Sandra Waxman, comparing infants in the U.S and China.

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Diane Schanzenbach on White House Panel: Food Stamp Program 'Investment, Not Charity'

Diane Schanzenbach on White House Panel: Food Stamp Program 'Investment, Not Charity'

The federal food stamp program has a strong impact on health, education and economic self-sufficiency, according to leading economist Diane Schanzenbach, who presented at a White House panel on child hunger.

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SESP Researchers Undertake Adolescent Stress Study in Dominica

SESP Researchers Undertake Adolescent Stress Study in Dominica

Dominica News reports that postdoctoral researcher Royette Tavernier, who works with professor Emma Adam, is conducting a study to assess stress, coping, health and resilience among youth in Dominica after tropical storm Erika.

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Emma Adam on WGBH: 'How Discrimination Affects Your Hormone Levels'

Emma Adam on WGBH: 'How Discrimination Affects Your Hormone Levels'

SESP professor Emma Adam discovered a link between cortisol levels and experiences with racism that showed the long-term effect of being discriminated against as a teenager.

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<em>Washington Post</em> Reports Jon Guryan's Lottery Research: 'No Lucky Stores'

Washington Post Reports Jon Guryan's Lottery Research: 'No Lucky Stores'

There is no such thing as a "lucky" lottery store, although associate professor Jon Guryan's study found lottery sales jump as much as 38 percent at stores selling winning tickets.

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Jolie Matthews Explores History Learning in Online Fan Forums

Jolie Matthews Explores History Learning in Online Fan Forums

Digital learning expert and SESP assistant professor Jolie Matthews examines how people talk about history in online fan communities.

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Summer Reading Program Can Shrink Socioeconomic Reading Gaps

Summer Reading Program Can Shrink Socioeconomic Reading Gaps

An experiment by associate professor Jonathan Guryan found that a scaffolded summer reading program could shrink the summer reading gap experienced by children in lower socioeconomic status (SES) families.

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<em>New York Times</em> Features Michael Wolf's Study on Prescription Confusion

New York Times Features Michael Wolf's Study on Prescription Confusion

“We learn over and over again how challenging it is to maintain a drug regimen,” said Michael Wolf (MA06), an epidemiologist at Feinberg School of Medicine and a Learning Sciences graduate and faculty member.

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Universities' Messages about Socioeconomic Diversity Affect Academic Confidence

Universities' Messages about Socioeconomic Diversity Affect Academic Confidence

When students from low socioeconomic status backgrounds perceive their universities to be “chilly” towards students from their backgrounds, their academic confidence suffers, according to new Northwestern studies.

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Cynthia Coburn Champions Education Research to Improve Schools

Cynthia Coburn Champions Education Research to Improve Schools

Professor Cynthia Coburn, who is part of a renaissance in the field of educational research, is an expert on partnerships between education researchers and practitioners, called research-practice partnerships.

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David Uttal Receives Grant for Early STEM Learning Museum Project

David Uttal Receives Grant for Early STEM Learning Museum Project

A young child’s “playful tinkering” may lead to much more serious interest in science later on in life. That’s the rationale behind professor David Uttal’s new project with Chicago Children's Museum to advance early learning opportunities in STEM.

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Why Are Boys Falling Behind?

Why Are Boys Falling Behind?

Boys, especially African-American boys, are falling behind -- both behaviorally and educationally -- according to new research by SESP professor David Figlio. Young males, it appears, are extra sensitive to disadvantage.

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<em>New York Times</em>: David Figlio Finds Disadvantaged Start Hurts Boys More Than Girls

New York Times: David Figlio Finds Disadvantaged Start Hurts Boys More Than Girls

The New York Times reports new findings by SESP professor David Figlio and his colleagues that a disadvantaged start hurts boys more than girls. Family disadvantage takes more of a toll on boys than on their sisters.

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<em>La Presse</em> Features Emma Adam's Research on Discrimination Stress

La Presse Features Emma Adam's Research on Discrimination Stress

The Canadian newspaper La Presse features professor Emma Adam's study showing discrimination stress has a cumulative effect on health over time. The discrimination has a greater long-term impact when it occurs during adolescence.

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Fox News Features Jon Guryan's Research Showing Benefits of Intensive Tutoring

Fox News Features Jon Guryan's Research Showing Benefits of Intensive Tutoring

Fox News quotes associate professor Jonathan Guryan on the benefits of a high-intensity tutoring program in Chicago Public Schools. Intense tutoring enabled 9th and 10th graders at risk of dropping out to learn two to three years’ worth of math in one year.

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SESP Receives $1M Spencer Award to Expand Computational Literacy in Schools

SESP Receives $1M Spencer Award to Expand Computational Literacy in Schools

The School of Education and Social Policy received a prestigious Lyle Spencer Research Award of $1.1 million to expand computational literacy in schools by teaching skills in required high school science and mathematics courses.

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Doctoral Student Elizabeth Dyer Wins AERA Research Fellowship

Doctoral Student Elizabeth Dyer Wins AERA Research Fellowship

Learning Sciences doctoral student Elizabeth Dyer was awarded a dissertation fellowship from the American Education Research Association to investigate responsive teaching practices in mathematics, which attend to and build on students’ thinking.

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<em>Boston Globe</em> Quotes Emma Adam about Stress of Prejudice Harming Long-Term Health

Boston Globe Quotes Emma Adam about Stress of Prejudice Harming Long-Term Health

Racial minorities who live with daily stress of prejudice may pay a price affecting their long-term health, according to SESP professor Emma Adam's study reported in the Boston Globe.

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Discrimination during Adolescence Has Lasting Effect on Body

Discrimination during Adolescence Has Lasting Effect on Body

Perceived discrimination alters the body’s stress hormone levels, and in African-Americans the negative effects are stronger than in whites, according to a study of cumulative effects led by professor Emma Adam. The teenage years are a particularly sensitive period.

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Jim Spillane Receives $1 Million Spencer Award for School System Research

Jim Spillane Receives $1 Million Spencer Award for School System Research

Professor James Spillane received a $1 million Lyle Spencer Research Award for a comparative study of school systems. Spillane’s research will investigate the relationship between various types of school systems and improving instruction.

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Mike Horn Wins Best Paper Award for Presentation in Korea

Mike Horn Wins Best Paper Award for Presentation in Korea

Assistant professor Michael Horn's presentation in Korea on the effective design of interactive digital museum exhibits won a Best Paper Award at the ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems.

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Improving the Transitions of Novice Principals

Improving the Transitions of Novice Principals

SESP professor James Spillane researches the transitions of novice school principals. A recent study examines challenges for new principals and how to ease this process.

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<em>Atlantic</em> Features Dan McAdams on Life Stories

Atlantic Features Dan McAdams on Life Stories

An Atlantic magazine article on the importance of life narratives to personality features the work of SESP professor Dan McAdams.

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Emma Adam, Lindsay Chase-Lansdale Coauthor Study Finding Weight Gain with Fatherhood

Emma Adam, Lindsay Chase-Lansdale Coauthor Study Finding Weight Gain with Fatherhood

A study of how fatherhood affects health found that a 6-foot-tall man who becomes a dad gains an average of 4.4 pounds. SESP professors Emma Adam and Lindsay Chase-Lansdale coauthored the study with lead author Craig Garfield.

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White House Report Highlights SESP Research on Disadvantaged Youth

White House Report Highlights SESP Research on Disadvantaged Youth

A report by the President’s Council of Economic Advisors highlights findings of associate professors Jonathan Guryan, on reducing crime and dropout, and Diane Schanzenbach on preschool education and income inequality.

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Mike Horn Receives Prestigious CAREER Award to Expand Computing

Mike Horn Receives Prestigious CAREER Award to Expand Computing

Assistant professor Michael Horn received a National Science Foundation CAREER Award to study computational literacy in informal learning environments, through a project called “Blocks, Stickers, and Puzzles.”

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David Uttal Tests Spatial Skills Training for STEM Achievement

David Uttal Tests Spatial Skills Training for STEM Achievement

SESP professor David Uttal's new study will test whether spatial training actually leads to STEM achievement in school and beyond — an outcome that is important for the future of the U.S.

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Quick to Smile? Claudia Haase's Study Finds It May Be in Your Genes

Quick to Smile? Claudia Haase's Study Finds It May Be in Your Genes

A new study by SESP assistant professor Claudia Haase finds that people with a certain gene variant are less stoic and are more likely to smile and laugh.

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PBS Offers Mike Horn’s Evolution Games as Online Lab for High School

PBS Offers Mike Horn’s Evolution Games as Online Lab for High School

Assistant professor Michael Horn’s museum research on evolution has become part of a new online PBS NOVA unit for high school students called “Evolution Lab,” with games to introduce teens to processes of evolution.

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Patient Portals Could Widen Health Disparities

Patient Portals Could Widen Health Disparities

Patient portals that provide medical information online could widen the gap in health disparities among the most vulnerable patients, according to a new study by professor Michael Wolf (MA06) of SESP and Feinberg School of Medicine.

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Trust Increases with Age, Benefits Well-Being

Trust Increases with Age, Benefits Well-Being

New research by SESP assistant professor Claudia Haase suggests a bright side to getting older. Trust increases with age and predicts increases in well-being, according to Haase's study.

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Societally Engaged Adults See Their Lives as Redemption Stories

Societally Engaged Adults See Their Lives as Redemption Stories

Middle-aged Americans who show high levels of societal involvement and mental health are especially likely to construe their lives as stories of personal redemption, according to new research by professor Dan McAdams.

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Claudia Haase's Research Highlights the Bright Side of Aging

Claudia Haase's Research Highlights the Bright Side of Aging

As spouses age, they show more positive emotional behaviors, such as humor, and fewer negative ones, such as defensiveness, SESP assistant professor Claudia Haase's studies show.

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Jim Rosenbaum Reports on Challenge of Completing Community College

Jim Rosenbaum Reports on Challenge of Completing Community College

Professor James Rosenbaum and his colleagues find that many young people who enroll in community college fail to complete their studies and attain a degree.

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Jon Guryan Finds Prize Payments Induce Savings Behavior

Jon Guryan Finds Prize Payments Induce Savings Behavior

Americans are more likely to save if they have the option of winning a prize when they make a deposit, according to research by SESP associate professor Jon Guryan.

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Cynthia Coburn Works to Expand Research in Early Math Education

Cynthia Coburn Works to Expand Research in Early Math Education

Because scientific-based research on the topic is lacking, SESP professor Cynthia Coburn is helping to develop new research on young children’s math learning. The DREME network will lead key projects on important early math topics.

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<em>Atlantic</em> Quotes Jim Rosenbaum, SESP Alums in 'Will Ending Segregation End Poverty?'

Atlantic Quotes Jim Rosenbaum, SESP Alums in 'Will Ending Segregation End Poverty?'

An Atlantic article on "Is Ending Segregation the Key to Ending Poverty?" includes interviews about housing policy with SESP professor James Rosenbaum and alumni Ruby Mendenhall, Stephanie DeLuca and Susan Popkin.

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David Uttal Discusses Program That Improves Students' Spatial Skills

David Uttal Discusses Program That Improves Students' Spatial Skills

SESP professor David Uttal discussed a program that has enhanced students’ learning at a variety of levels, from basic spatial reasoning to solving complex problems involving the coordination of numerous variables, at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) annual meeting.

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<em>New York Times</em> on Jon Guryan's Study: Tutoring to Close Math Gap 'Never Too Late'

New York Times on Jon Guryan's Study: Tutoring to Close Math Gap 'Never Too Late'

SESP professor Jon Guryan and his colleagues found that disadvantaged boys who received intensive tutoring performed substantially better on standardized math tests, reducing the usual black-white test score gap by a third, and improved other school outcomes too.

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<em>Education Week</em> Features Jim Rosenbaum's Research on Community College Success

Education Week Features Jim Rosenbaum's Research on Community College Success

Education Week reports professor James Rosenbaum's recent research showing the challenge of helping students complete community college. Many students are dropping out before getting any credential.

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Hearing Human Speech Promotes Babies' Learning in Many Ways

Hearing Human Speech Promotes Babies' Learning in Many Ways

A new study by Northwestern professor Sandra Waxman reveals that listening to human speech has consequences for infants that go beyond learning words.

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