Student-Organized Seminars

Student-organized seminars are courses initiated by students and supervised by sponsoring faculty that cover topics of the students' choice not typically covered in other course work. Creating and running a student-organized seminar gives students a opportunity to teach and explore in depth topics that they are passionate about and a chance to take on leadership roles. In addition, students are able to work closely with faculty/advisers, as well as develop meaningful relationships with fellow students with similar interests.

In conjunction with a faculty sponsor, the students prepare a seminar plan and submit it to the Director of Undergraduate Studies, Miriam Sherin, by the fifth Friday of the preceeding quarter.

Deadlines
  • October 25, 2013
  • February 7, 2014
  • May 2, 2014

Seminar Plan

The seminar plan includes the description of the topic, the reading list, specifications of assignments and examinations, prerequisites, the meeting schedule and the written approval of the sponsoring faculty member. The seminar plan must be approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies, Miriam Sherin.

Enrollment in the student-organized seminars is on a pass/no credit basis and thus may only be counted as an elective (enrollment is capped at 15, including the student instructors).

The seminar leaders are required to participate in a leadership development seminar coordinated by the Searle Center for Advancing Learning and Teaching. The leaders will meet prior to the beginning of their seminar to discuss their syllabus. During the quarter the seminar is offered, the leaders will meet periodically to discuss how the seminar is progressing and common issues experienced when running a seminar, including how to facilitate discussion. Participation in the leadership development seminar will impact the student leaders receiving a P or N grade.

If you are interested in organizing a student-organized seminar, contact Susan Olson. Note that facilitating this seminar is the only type of teaching that an undergraduate student may do.