Research

Research

WHY WE OFTEN RELY ON INACCURATE INFORMATION WHY WE OFTEN RELY ON INACCURATE INFORMATION

WHY WE OFTEN RELY ON INACCURATE INFORMATION

SMALL SCHOOL BIG RESEARCH

Even when people know better, they often rely on inaccurate or misleading information to make future decisions. David Rapp’s research looks into why we are so easily influenced by false statements and what we can do to avoid relying on incorrect information.

Read more about Rapp’s research

Can a Growth Mindset Boost Coding Skills?

Can a Growth Mindset Boost Coding Skills?

Introductory computer science classes often have trouble retaining students, perhaps in part because they often promote a fixed mindset or the belief that great programmers are born and not made.

Saving Lives with Social Policy

Saving Lives with Social Policy

Income inequality and health inequality are not necessarily connected, according to a new study of U.S. and French death rates examining the often-studied link between poverty and poor health.

Northwestern, CPS Launch Rapid Impact Grants Program

Northwestern, CPS Launch Rapid Impact Grants Program

SESP and Chicago Public Schools (CPS) have created the Rapid Impact Grants Program -- an accelerated program that will fund small projects that address pressing research needs to help inform practice and propel academic progress in the nation’s third-largest school district.

SESP in the Media: August 2018

SESP in the Media: August 2018

An ongoing, monthly roundup of appearances in the news media by School of Education and Social Policy faculty, researchers, and our community.

SESP Graduate Students Win Dev Sci Funding

SESP Graduate Students Win Dev Sci Funding

Northwestern University doctoral students Mollie McQuillian, Jacquelyn Stephens and Courtenay Kessler have been awarded seed grant funding for ambitious research projects that promote health and well-being across the lifespan from the DevSci Center for Transdisciplinary Training and The Graduate School.  

SNAP Benefits Reduced When Work Requirements Rise

SNAP Benefits Reduced When Work Requirements Rise

Expanding work requirements for those participating in the federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) would hurt millions of people already in the workforce, especially those with low levels of education, Northwestern University labor economist Diane Shanzenbach wrote in Brookings.